ELECINF344/381

Partie interactive du site pédagogique ELECINF344/ELECINF381 de Télécom ParisTech (occurrence 2011).

Catégories

Copterix: a wonderful day

While Loïc and Bertrand were working on Friday’s presentation slides, Samuel and myself spent the whole day testing our copter’s PID.

We finally found two majors bugs in our code (a motor offset unbalancing the system and a Integral term too often cleared). After that we were able for the first time to get a real flight while only acting on the thrust using remote control. We now have to add yaw PID and altitude PID and we may have something really nice to show on Friday.

Copterix: Flight in the complex

Today, we went to the complex, a more spacious room than the one where we used to do our tests. The tests were quite conclusive. We were able to do some « landing » (the copter was caught by Axel near the floor because of turbulences caused by the proximity of this obstacle). With more power to the motors, we made the copter stay longer in the air, about 10/20 seconds (sadly, it wasn’t filmed).

We also used the remote to control the trust and the setpoint of the PID. It will need some software adjustments since it is still to brutal and rather hard to use.

Tomorrow, we’ll restore height control in our PID and see how much the copter drifts. This drift shall be corrected with the remote.

Copterix : First outdoor flight

We can now control the attitude of our copter with the RF remote control. We have also implemented the possibility of turning on/off the motors directly with the RF remote control. Bertrand has made a script for running all the control tasks at boot. We can thus take control of our Copter as soon as the gumstix has started and is running Linux, without using any SSH connexion.

Then, we took the Copter outside for a first flight in real conditions. We succeed in taking off, but I wasn’t very comfortable with it. Then, we had a big crash: Bertrand accidentally put the thrust too high at the takeoff. The Copter overturned and damaged/broke some propellers. Fortunately, we put a protection onto the motors’ boards yesterday. They thus don’t seem to have suffered damages. Here are some photos after the crash. (Photos are from Samuel Tardieu)

the broken propeller... what a shame.

Crash of the 22th April, 2011

 

Tomorrow, we’ll try to improve our PID algorithm for pitch, yaw and roll, and then we’ll probably work on the Kanade algorithm, for X and Y control loop.

Copterix : PID on the way

Today, our purpose was also to find the good values for the PID. At the beginning, the copter was very instable and oscillating. But after having changed the structure of the PID (before we had 6 values to configure, now we have only 3 coefficients), the impact of each coefficients was more easily to understand. The result seems good, but it will be better when we will have the camera and the Sharp (distance sensor). Here is a little video illustrating our breakthrough:

 

 

 

 

Copterix : first moves

Yesterday we finally observed the first moves of our octocopter. After spending all the day working on the communication with the motors, Samuel and Axel have succeeded in controlling the motors from the STM32, with the help of Jon, passing by. They speak to them in I2C, and they can control the speed of the propellers. The Copter tried to run away, but he was fortunately attached on a table. However, we have to be more careful in the way we will attach it in the future, because it was close to a disaster.

On my side, I tried the RF controller, a Spektrum DX7 transmitter/receiver. I tested it on the STM32 board that we have previously use for the communication challenge, it works as we can expect, thanks to the code of the Heliokter team. We use indeed the code from last year’s project, which seems to fit to our needs. The RF receiver gives us access to different integers, which indicate us the pitch, the roll, the yaw and the thrust, and also some commands. The way the receiver communicates with the PCB is simple : it use the RS232 protocol, with a speed of 115200 kbps. It sends packets of 16 bytes separated by long period with idle line. I have implemented the code for our PCB and for getting the commands on the Gumstix, but I still need to test it.

On his side, Bertrand principally tried to debug some aspect of the STM32 code. When we send data in the both directions and look for the values of the sensors at the same time, some freezes occur. We think it’s maybe because the code needs some optimization, so Bertrand is working on it.