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RoseOnRails – the train is on!

Hi all.

Well as you have seen in my teammates’ posts, a whole lot of thigns have been going on lately in our project: the LEDs are shining everywhere in the circuit now, and the little loco is running 🙂

As Yann explained, yesterday, we finished to complete the circuit with LEDs and tried to command them through BLE, which we unfortunately didn’t manage to achieve, since the UART communication betweeen our nRF and our STM32 failed to work. It might be because of an error in the pin decalarations in the board.h file (which would lead to the nRF TX pin connected to the STM32 TX pin, both configured as output!) The thing is that now when we measure the TX pin on the nRF we have an anormally low amplitude (0.5V when the pin is set). According to Alexis, this is very probably due either to a shirt circuit between this pin and GND (which I verified wasn’t the case) either the nRF’s internal P transistor which is damaged, which we therefore think is the case. In short, we decided to use another pin for the TX on the nRF (since on the nRF we can choose the pin we want to use for TX and RX, contrary to the STM32 where it’s imposed by hardware). The nRF RX pin got damaged too but it doesn’ matter because we only use TX (nRF) -> RX (STM32). So Alexis kindly soldered 2 other nRF pins (too smal to be soldered invidually) to the RX pin on the STM32. We still have to test it but haven’t had the time this afternoon.

This afternoon, we also dealt with the “problem” of the motor on the locomotive. More precisely, we noticed that the motor couldn’t start up when directly supplied wuith 22V (which is the voltage of the rails). However, when supplied with 10V then progressivley up to 21V, the motor did continue to turn. We tried to “simulate” this progressiveness with progressively rising our PWM’s duty-cyle, but still, the motor didn’t want to work. We then thought it might come from the OCP (Over Current Protection) of our HBridge which might just deactivate the output when the current drawn was above 3.5A. But, when trying to verify this with the oscilloscope, we found out that the soldering of the motor’s wires on the PCB was far from being perfect, which led to the motor randomly stop working when tilted to one side for instance…!! In short, after having discussed with PHH and Olivier and having read the datasheet of the HBridge, still without any rational explanation, we went to see “doctor Alexis” who “cured” our loco by replacing the HBridge (which was damaged because of an over current and a lack of decoupling capacitor) and adding another decouplig capacitor to the power supply pin. Furthermore, he advised us not to supply the rails with 22V any more but rather with a maximum of 15-18V. After having done all this, we now manage to control the motor thourgh BLE. See Noémie’s post for the fabulous video 🙂 or rather, come see us in a406 for the stunning live demo (@Sam)

Next step(s) -> Test the Hall captors (we soldered them tonight on the loco), test the turnout PCBs (Alexis kindly finished to solder them all 5 today), control everything in BLE.

Then of course, we have to finish the intelligence code for the game…

See you very soon!