About LEDs

First ideas

Our original idea was to place LEDs on the inner sphere of the sculpture, either with flex PCB, or by drilling the sphere, placing the LED in the holes and connecting them with wires to a rotating PCB contained into the sphere. To facilitate the positioning of the LEDs, we could have modified the design so that we can pin the petals one by one on the inner sphere rather than print everything in one block.

But these designs are not easily achievable. First, Alexis does not know how to design flex PCBs. Second, to have a satisfactory visual impression, we would like to have at least 100 petals. To justify this number, here is a model with 60 petals, and another with 100 petals, and a third with 150 petals.

With 60, 100 and 150 petals respectively.

In the above images, there will also be petals all the way to the center, but there will be only one light for all of them. In the above images, only the petals that would have their individual LED are shown. There will of course be petals all the way to the center, but the center ones will all share the same light.

With 100 petals and a single LED per petal, it would make 400 solder wire, which is unthinkable (especially given that the sculpture will turn).

Flat PCB

After discussion with Alexis, we agreed to place the LEDs on a flat rotating PCB with the same phyllotactic arrangement. Here is a simulation example to imagine how we will place the LEDs:  

The idea of abandoning 3D sculptures without struggle did not please us. That’s why we will try to give a 3D impression while leaving the LEDs on the flat PCB. To do this, our best idea so far is to use light pipes to guide LEDs light to the petals, like in the figure below:

Ideally, we would be able to keep flower-shaped sculptures similar to those of John Edmark. But in case we cannot have full-blown 3D sculptures, we could still add a little bit of  relief. Here’s what it could look like:

Today, Alexis has ordered a selection of compatible light pipes and LEDs, so that next week, we can do tests to measure the loss of brightness per cm inside the pipes and the influence of a LED on its neighbors (loss of brightness at the entrance of the guide).

LEDs overheating

Another problem that we are likely to encounter is the overheating of the LEDs. For 100 RGB LEDs (which need to be switched on at the same time), with a maximum of 100 mA per color, a current of 30A is required. So if we power the LEDs with 4V, we need a power of 120W.
We started to think about solutions to cool the LEDs: drill holes in the sculpture to ventilate the LEDs, use a Metal Core PCB (MCPCB, such as below) instead of a FR4-PCB, use heat sinks, LEDs with an electrically isolated thermal path (such as Cree XLamp LEDs).

Layers of a MCPCB

But our LEDs will be under light pipes so they will not be well ventilated by the holes in the sculpture. The MCPCB will not allow us to put all the components that we need, in particular we can not solder components on the back of the PCB. The mask solder is only on the top layer, on which the LEDs are placed, and the bottom layer ends with aluminum or copper, and it is not possible to add FR4 and copper after the layer in aluminium. And the heat sinks all seem to have a disproportionate size for our use.

Before continuing research on the overheating of LEDs, we will use LEDs already ordered which I mentioned above to test their heating.

  If you have any idea or suggestion, all comments are much welcome !