LitSimulate

LitSimulate is a simulator which simulates what LitSpin will display. We developed the first versions with PyOpenGL and PyGame.

Image Format

Each 3D image is represented by a classical image. If we note r the radial resolution (total number of columns), h the number of LEDs by column and n the number of steps by rotation, our image dimensions are rh x n. In our case r=20, h=32 and n=128. So we have 640×128. One line represents the n points one led will display. And each block of h lines represents the 360° image of a column from the outermost to the innermost (from 1 to r).… Read more

Ah, yes. Stereoscopic vision.

This is a follow-up to my previous article, in which we explored the choice of PCB placement in order to get an optimal visibility.

My previous analysis only covered the case of a punctual point of view. However, most people have two eyes, which provide a double point of view and could increase our coverage of space. It is to be pointed out that a point of space seen by one eye does not provide depth information to the brain, however let us assume that our image perception is smart enough to overcome this limit.

In the following simulation, we used a typical eye distance of 6 cm.… Read more

Choosing a shape

As stated in this previous post, we have to compare different PCB dispositions to avoid blind spots. We soon came to realization that we would not be able to get rid of blind spots with our design, but it is possible to study the different ideas we came up with in order to mitigate this issue.

That’s why we created a python program that can simulate :

  • blind spots created by PCBs hiding each other
  • the variations of brightness due to the fact that LEDs can be seen at an angle (which is what created the dark center zone in CyL3D, which we are trying to get rid of)

Stairs : an iteration over CyL3D’s design

To avoid the issue of a dark zone due to all LEDs facing the observer at an angle in the center zone, an idea was to make sure that all LEDs were not facing the same direction.… Read more

Design Crisis

We discovered our first model contained a lot of issues. The outermost PCB often hide PCB behind them as you can see below. This results in some voxels being invisible. So we decided to create a simulator on Python to find the invisible areas. We will use it to determine the optimal configuration for our display. This configuration has several parameters such as the number of PCB, their position and the arrangement of the LED on one or both sides.

This a an example with 8 double-sided PCB in double spiral and 100 angular resolution. The blue dots are the visible voxels.… Read more